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Barnsley Council hooks into PDS

22 November 2012   Rebecca Todd

Barnsley Town Hall's clock tower

Barnsley Council and Liquidlogic, a McKesson company, have achieved integration of NHS and social care records using the Personal Demographics Service.

Using Liquidlogic's adult social care management system, Barnsley is now able to match a person's NHS and social care record through NHS number validation against the PDS on the Spine.

The council has been using Liquidlogic since May 2009 and went fully operational with the PDS integration last month.

Barnsley Council business information manager, Ian Fereday, said it took around 2.5 years to go through the common assurance process with NHS Connecting for Health.

Part of the Department of Health Social Care Personal Demographics Service Early Adopters programme, Barnsley is one of the first councils to go live with full integration.

It enables Barnsley's social care workers and care practitioners to validate, in real-time, an individual's NHS Number on their social care record against their health care record.

This means that people no longer have to be asked for their personal details every time they are visited and allows carers to ensure that they are talking about the same person across health and social care, thereby preventing duplication or inaccuracy across care records.

Fereday said there are six live users at the moment, and the council is in the process of issuing smartcards to 100-150 staff.

Staff can not only access the PDS, but can update patient details when they change.

Fereday said the initiative is the "cornerstone" of Barnsley's aim to achieve integrated health and social care delivery.

The next stage involves an integration between Liquidlogic and TPP to enable care plans and assessments to be shared between social care workers, GPs and community staff such as district nurses.

Fereday expects this integration to go-live within a couple of months.

"At the moment we're trying to prove the concept that information sharing supports seamless delivery of care, then look at how to improve and enhance that," he explained.

Liquidlogic sales director Jim Sullivan said the project demonstrates the type of joined-up working which so many local authorities and health providers aspire to.

 

"Having been through the compliance process with NHS Connecting for Health, we are now confident that our product is resilient and robust to deliver an integrated system," he added.


Related Articles:

News: Cheshire social care staff access PDS | 1 February 2012
7 News: CfH removes door entry codes from PDS | 20 September 2011
Last updated: 23 November 2012 13:18

© 2012 EHealth Media.


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Can anyone find details?

Mary Hawking 86 weeks ago

There was a news flash in a pop-up screen yesterday (didn't appear today) but I cannot find anything on the Barnsley Council website.

Have the citizens of Barnsley been consulted - or even informed?

And if not, where is the Transparency in the apparently planned access of social care to medical records - and vice versa?


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Aren't we both in the same business

Ian Swanson2 86 weeks ago

This limited PDS connectivity, merely helps establish the same person for sharing under Information Sharing Protocols for two businesses that are both about care, and which share almost identical information governance architecture and professional standards.

Most citizen consultation shows that they expect care organisations to work together, and are surprised when they do not, and all of the Protocols I have been involved in allow an opt-out on an individual basis when the person consults with the non-universal service - social care.

The loss to citizens from failures in sharing and co-ordination are huge, and have been increased with the artificial divide we are creating with technology, compared with the human communication that went before.


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That wasn't the question..

Mary Hawking 86 weeks ago

In the pop-up, a patient was quoted as saying "once it was explained to me.."

What I was asking was whether the citizens of Barnsley had been consulted about the fusion of their medical and social care records: there certainly doesn't appear to be any readily available information on the various websites!

*Does* the expectation that care organisations should share information among the general public include the expectation that all parties should have full access to all information held on them?

I'd rather doubt it.


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Mary Hawking
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Well said

exNHS 86 weeks ago

Have to agree 100%


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Smartcards

CertaCitrus 86 weeks ago

Interesting project and hope to hear more about the care plan integration. Looks like this will be a test of mainstream patient health and social care confidentiality (I'm not sure 2.5 years is long considering this!).

It should be possible to utilize the NHS ITK to match patient records (trace), which should remove the need for smartcards.

However I suspect the smartcards is to enable portal access to System One., I hope this isn't the case

(on an IT level: having to access several computer systems via a number of security mechanisms and access controls will not win over leaving notes in a patient home - keeping confidentiality issues and the exchange of care information within the IM&T/IT depts may be easier)


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Will it still be possible to opt out ?

Mary Hawking 87 weeks ago

In PDS, it is (curently) still possible for individuals to conceal their demographics - and for some people - e.g. fleeing abusive relationships, or say having any connection with an animal lab - it remains a useful option.

In both Barnsley and N.E.Lincolnshire, it looks as though the fusion of social and health records - using PDS as a Master Index? - will give social workers access to the medical record, and the health service access to social service records - and no-one will be able to exercise their right to conceal their whereabouts, for any reason.

Or have I misunderstood the position?

Some years ago, police searching for surviving Latvians alleged to have been members of a death squad during the war, publically thanked the NHS for helping to trace them - and the National Tracing Service - which was then in charge - went ballistic: any requests for tracing individuals had to come to them - and would need a Court Order to get any co-operation whatsoever: now, it seems, local social service departments can get access to PDS for operational reasons, and I am not aware of any mechanism for ensuring that access is limited to a geaographical locality: as far as I am aware, there is no audit trail of viewing a PDS record, and the database covers the whole of England.

Have the local populations been either asked or informed about these developments?

I would have thought this was a situation where the recent DH IGT for shared records might apply.


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2.5 years - Crikey

Steve Fuller 87 weeks ago

Time well spent , but surely this is the type of solution that should have happened years ago ?


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re: 2.5 years - Crikey

mrtablet 87 weeks ago

>surely this is the type of solution that should have happened years ago<

Perhaps if "they" had branded the Compulsory National ID Card as an entitlement card and merged it with the NHS Number then there might have been such a solution.

The privacy and liberty issues remain the same though - whatever you call it.


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re: 2.5 years - Crikey...this is NOT new...

Phoenix 86 weeks ago

This isn't new and many will have forgotten the exciting work the NHS Information Authority (predessessor to NPfIT and CFH) were doing around this with NSTS (system prior to PDS). Social Care organisations had access to NSTS and use of the NHS Number back in 2000.

That said well done to Ian and others at Barnsley, to CFH and suppliers for cracking the Social Care access to PDS nut. This is a good step forward for the "Health and (Social) Care Business".


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