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South Staffs implements BYOD

7 September 2012   Chris Thorne

South Staffordshire and Shropshire NHS Foundation Trust has implemented a ‘bring your own device strategy’ as part of an initiative to improve its mobile working capability.

The trust, which provides mental health, learning disability and specialist children’s services across 120 premises, started with a “soft” roll-out of the strategy in May and now has 390 members of staff using mobile devices.

The policy is not compulsory and if staff want to use their own device they have to approach the trust’s IM&T department to obtain a licence.

Personal devices can be used to access work email and the organisation’s e-rostering system through a secure gateway.

At the moment, they cannot be used to access clinical systems, but the trust is looking to include such functionality once it implements Rio, its new electronic patient record, in April.

The trust’s head of IM&T development, Peter Kendal, said: “We are trying to reduce the cost to the trust of supplying devices.

“When the trust provided a device to a clinician, the cost over three years would be around £700; yet we have many staff who have smartphones that are over-specified for what they are used for.

“The BYOD policy is not forced on any of our staff. The agreement we have with them is that we will pay for the security licence, but we don’t cover the bandwidth that is used or pay the bill.”

The devices are secured with McAfee’s enterprise mobility management, which allows for the remote wiping of devices if they are lost. An agreement between the trust and its staff says that if this happens the IT department must be notified by the end of the working day.

The trust has the capability to support 5,000 users. It has also recently purchased 1,200 laptops from Dell as part of a move to a ‘hot desk’ working environment.

“We have also rolled out iPads and Android devices, as we are trying to find a way of enabling staff,” Kendal said.

“This has been a project led by staff and not by technology. The feedback has been positive as we are not compelling staff to use it. Security is an evolutionary process but we are now comfortable with this process.”

The pros and cons of BYOD in the health service are explored in this week’s Insight.


Related Articles:

Insight: Devices and desires | 6 September 2012
1 Insight: The rise of the CCIO, a US view | 17 August 2012
Last updated: 7 September 2012 10:25

© 2012 EHealth Media.


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Why Tablets and iPads?????

Where's Wally? 110 weeks ago

This is a very interesting topic. At a recent IT meeting we discussed the use of tablets instead of standard and small footprint laptops as well as development of apps for smart devices and BYOD. One observation struck a chord%u226.

%u21D%u226. it%u219s not the iPads they want, it%u219s the iPad experience%u226%u226.%u21D

So what is the iPad/Tablet experience (as opposed to a laptop experience) and how does that translate into a health service environment?

If the past is anything to go on iPads and similar devices are desired because%u226

1. They are cool.

2. If you are not in a coffee shop working on your iPad then you are not an important person with important things to do.

3. You can check email, respond to email, take pictures, post them on Facebook, catch up with your friends, book holidays and restaurants, and check your bids on eBay, all on the same device.

OK so a bit of tongue in cheek with this so far but if anyone out there actually has a business case with a benefits analysis showing measurable empirical cost benefits for the use of tablets as opposed to those %u21Cso last year%u21D mini laptops please spread it about%u226%u226

I do believe that development of apps for smart-phones and similar devices will be of benefit to our patients as a contact and communications conduit to services.


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Actually...

Groundhog Day 110 weeks ago

I think you will find that portability, ergonomics and the ability to enter data easily on the move is the issue for users who are predominantly on their feet.

I think the business case for providing patient data to every nurse/doctor/AHP who brings in their own device instead of having to queue at the single ward PC workstation would be overwhelming...


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Yea but yea but yea.....

Where's Wally? 110 weeks ago

Understand Groundhog...... Security of the information and the network on which the BOYD is used is the predominate question. Still would like to see someone crunch numbers, deal with the access and security issues and the resulting business case as to why a tablet or smart device is needed as opposed to some other hand held device such as a mini laptop or even net-book which can be fully secured and protected


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Exciting possibilities for clinicians

Neelam Dugar 111 weeks ago

I am really excited about BYOD. All PACS suppliers are showing off PACS viewing on iPADs. This would clinicians with ward rounds if access could be provided securely on their personal IPADs or other tablet devices. Obviously data security is important.


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