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ISoft makes move on life sciences

21 December 2010   Sarah Bruce

ISoft has signed a marketing agreement with US company, CliniWorks, to market its AccelFind software to healthcare organisations across the world.

The software enables users to extract and de-identify medical knowledge from any type of data; including free text notes, discharge summaries or structured data such as those stored in electronic records or lab systems.

The agreement will see iSoft provide AccelFind as part of its Life Sciences solution, under the ‘Powered by CliniWorks’ banner.

ISoft’s director for life sciences, Dr Joerg Kraenzlein, said: “This is a tremendous opportunity to accelerate clinical research in a so far unprecedented way.

"[It will] tap into new areas of treatment options and value propositions that have the potential to change the way we perform medicine and use healthcare IT today.”

ISoft has already signed a deal with German personalised medication company, Cytolon, to integrate the tool into its web based platform that integrates product search and matching-to-patient, logistics and follow-up for the matching of stem cell products.

The extract tool will allow hospitals and organisation to extract clinical information regardless of the database that they use.

ISoft’s chief medical officer, Dr Michael Dahlweid, added: “Life Sciences is a new strategic asset of iSoft’s solution portfolio with a huge growth potential.

"It perfectly fits our Smart Solution approach, which provides instant value to existing and new customers.”

 



Related Articles:

1 News: ISoft sells Business Solutions to Capita | 20 December 2010
10 News: ISoft sale 'one of the options' | 8 December 2010
News: iSoft promises new UK products | 8 November 2010
3 News: ISoft: ‘We should have acted sooner' | 2 November 2010
Last updated: 22 December 2010 13:18

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Donation of Data ?

Virginian 174 weeks ago

Not sure i follow - who owns the data? Who has the right to decide what happens to this data - the patient or the clinician or the Trust? And one other thought - from my experience in the USA - companies are selling the data and making a pretty good income from it ! Be careful.


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Data Ownership

george385 174 weeks ago

I believe that the Secretary of State owns the data - I think that its time we had a definitive statement to clarify this?


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Data Ownership mk2

DeeDee 174 weeks ago

The SOS is the data controller for the SCR and each legal organisation will have a nominated data controller who is responsible for ensuring the patient data meets the standards laid down by the care record guarantee, IG toolkit, DQ standards such as IM&T DES etc. The owner of the data in the patient record is actually the patient which is something the new government is going to great pains to point out. This brings Jon's point about data donation back to the fore but section 60 does lay out what type of data can be used without specific patient consent and by whom. I'm not sure if this helps or not but I thought I'd give it a shot. For more detail check out; http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2001/15/section/60

and

http://www.nigb.nhs.uk/guarantee/2009-nhs-crg.pdf


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Morecambe Bay

spotlight 174 weeks ago

I am sure that the outpatient clerks at Morecambe Bay will be really excited about this initiative


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Data Analysis (acute sector)

george385 174 weeks ago

I've worked with the NHS as both an employee, clinical locum, and IT contractor and in my experience (25years) I really don't see this kind of data analysis going on?

Its one of the reasons why - still today - hospital A will treat condition X with care plan 1, and hospital B will treat condition X with no plan whatsoever.

The anomalies of treatment become even more obvious when you start working across large geographic areas.

Can someone remind me what NICE was supposed to be for?

Every hospital trust still seems to be doing its own thing?

Many hospitals are still not even discharging their patients with a legible or complete discharge summary?


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Interesting move

Jon Hoeksma 174 weeks ago

Interesting move.

Cerner have already been making a lot of running in this area in the US. Its an obvious place for hospitals with a lot of patient data to go, to get more benefit for them and their patients out of the vast amounts of data they hold in EPR and clinical systems.

Hospitals know a great deal about patient treatments (including medications) and outcomes, there must be a growing overlap with the sort of clinical trials data systems used by pharma companies.

One interesting questions is whether the patient can control this data? How can they control whether they donate their data to the latest hypertension drug trial ---- get some tangible benefit in return? Or should donating data be a quid pro quo of recieving NHS treatment?


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Quid pro quo?

lindad 174 weeks ago

Agree that NHS data has huge potential to help researchers fight disease but have problems with patients 'donating' their data as a "quid pro quo for receiving NHS treatment"? We pay for NHS treatment (look at your tax bill) and IMHO no one should feel the need to give data as an obligation for receiving treatment.


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Asking the question

Jon Hoeksma 174 weeks ago

I was more just asking the question of donating data, as this is one the ideas that got mentioned by Christine Connelly and Stephen Burns at EHI Live.

I think their example was of a patient making a donation of data to Cancer UK.


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