23 October 2014 02:33


News
Twitter RSS Newsletter Send to a friend
12

'Large numbers' of staff to lose jobs

14 July 2010   Fiona Barr

The Department of Health’s informatics directorate is safe from immediate change as is the job of its head, Christine Connelly.

However, the number of managerial staff across the NHS will decrease “significantly”, according to a letter from the NHS chief executive.

Sir David Nicholson has written to all NHS chief executives to set out how the massive reorganisation of the NHS outlined in this week’s white paper will be implemented.

In the letter he says “large numbers of people” working in primary care trusts, arm’s length bodies, strategic health authorities and the DH will be affected by the changes.

The white paper - 'Equity and excellence: Liberating the NHS' - will launch a top to bottom reorganisation of the NHS, that will include slimming down the DH, scrapping SHAs and PCTs and the devolution of a large part of the NHS budget to GP consortia.

The letter adds: “Numbers of managerial staff will decrease significantly. Staff may also experience change in who they work for and the nature of that work.”

The NHS chief executive goes on to say that he will ensure that “every member of staff in an SHA or PCT has the opportunity for a discussion with their line manager on the changes and how they may affect them as they develop."

All staff should have had an initial discussion with their line manager by the end of September. The letter says formal consultation with staff and their representatives will be handled locally.

Sir David tells chief executives that immediate steps need to be taken to split commissioner and provider functions at national and regional level. He says this work should be completed by the end of the year.

The letter announces that it will be led by two new appointments – Dame Barbara Hakin as managing director of commissioning development and Ian Dalton as managing director of provider development.

A “bridging function” at national level will be led by the NHS chief executive and SHAs will be made responsible for the initial steps in the transformation process in their regions.

The letter says there will be “no immediate changes” to other key functions including informatics and that existing director generals will continue to lead on their national policy framework.

The letter says any changes to their functions will be part of the next phase of transition.

On Monday, Sir David said an announcement on the future of the National Programme for IT in the NHS will be made in four weeks, with an information strategy to follow in the autumn.

In his letter, Sir David says the Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention initiative will continue to be of central importance as the white paper is implemented.

Regional QIPP plans will become QIPP and Reform plans with current QIPP plans split between commissioner and provider requirements.

The 15 page letter adds that the NHS chief executive intends to strength central controls on quality, finance, operations and QIPP delivery while the new system is delivered.

At this year's NHS Confederation conference in Liverpool, Sir David underlined his personal commitment to the NHS. He urged managers to lead the changes and to find the "energy" in the "values" of the NHS.

In line with this, his letter urges managers to exhibit “leadership behaviours” and to “avoid becoming commentators” on the coalition's plans. He says they should look beyond self interest and see how opportunities can be maximised rather than simply mitigating risks.

He adds: “Your leadership behaviours will absolutely set the tone for the period we are now in and directly impact on our chances of success.”

The letter is the first in a series of communications that Sir David will send over coming months.


Related Articles:

Last updated: 13 July 2010 18:07

© 2010 E-HEALTH-MEDIA LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


Follow

Main problem - has a point 2

Unknown 222 weeks ago

Agreed - how can/does this happen

Isn't all the rhetoric about empowering clinicians to manage only going to make this worse....many clinical leads move into management without management skills

Equally, there's been so many re-srtucturings people get moved to jobs they don't have skills to do whilst the people with the skills move onto get jobs somewhere else

Here's hoping in the restructuring there will be considerations of skills to do the job not (in)competencies to do the job


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

Main Problem has a point!

Unknown 222 weeks ago

NHS is not ready for IT

Abracadabra teach them all

Let the managers be World Class Project Officers

Sounds about right, doesn't it!

Way to go


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

We are just waiting for India to take over...............

Unknown 222 weeks ago

The amount of wastage on IT systems in the NHS boggles belief.

Nothing is sacred especially for the hacker with Aspergers......

the savings in outsourcing will eventually attract the pack...


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

Main Problem

Unknown 222 weeks ago

The root cause behind all the management fuss fuss is that many managers in the NHS come from no Management background or any background other then working for the organisation for a number of years. I would like to ask this question from everyone, “ How can a Personal Assistant working for the NHS for 10 years, just been to college be a Project Manager for a Major IT programme having no knowledge about IT what so ever”

The problem is not with the manager’s, the problem is managers being managers without any skill set which everyone would agree.


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

40% cull in the NLOP'ed out PfITs though?

Unknown 222 weeks ago

Or so someone said in the pub.


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

Since moving from public sector to the private sector 4 years ago...

Unknown 222 weeks ago

I was a public sector CIO, finally in the NHS. Life's been a lot easier since I moved as:

- There’s more money

- More intelligent leadership

- No political 'direction' to keep screwing things up

- An understanding that to get stuff done on time one needs sufficient resources

- Good support from professional PAs, Finance and HR and not the lazy dimwits you will probably be accustomed to

- A shared sense of a need to survive and so not make stupid decisions, implement stupid unrealistic policies or generally slow everything down for 6-12 months just because you can

- Much shorter documents, so less to read unlike the biblical tomes the NHS and others push out

So consequently a lot less pressure and certainly fewer managers looking mentally ill (unlike 50% of NHS managers I knew).

Hope that helps. In ICT I've found life easier and healthier in the private sector.


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

Leadership Qualities II

Unknown 222 weeks ago

Welcome to the world of the private sector which the rest of the country have had to endure for years.


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

Leadership Qualities

Unknown 222 weeks ago

So, on the one hand I have a wife, kids and a mortgage to pay.  On the other hand I have a job where I am told I am useless and I need to work hard to get rid of myself, and while I'm doing it my pay will be frozen.  The choices I have are (a) lead everyone over the cliff or (b) lead everyone out of the door to the new quango.  Hmmm  tough one this one.  For the record Im not commenting on the coalition strategy, just trying to work out what the correct thing to do is.  Now let me see, wife and kids, job, wife and kids, job.  Can anyone help me decide?  My hearts saying wife and kids, but the coalition governement I didnt vote for is saying job.  Hang on I've got it.  Im useless so they dont need my leadership skills, out the door it is.......can the last leader to leave turn the lights off please.


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

Perspective

Unknown 222 weeks ago

"Change has to be formulated and directed centrally"

I suggest you re-read the Whie Paper


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:

Perspective Needed....

Unknown 223 weeks ago

The combined HR budget of DHID must be 0.1% of that of the NHS. Therefore, a cull would hardly be cost effective. Change has to be formulated and directed centrally, and the informatics function of the DH is very well placed to play of role in supporting the information needs of the Coalitions plans.


Reply
Flag
 
Like

This comment is:

Email address:

Submit

Follow

Post

 

Expertise:
Sector:
Approved posts:
Likes:
My EHI score:
Reward badges:
 
[1] 2

EHealth Media Limited
EHealth Insider is managed and maintained by EHealth Media © 2014
Registered Office: 11 Campana Road, London SW6 4AS
Registered No. 4214439 | Vat No. 774 4008 29
About us | Advertise | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy | Cookie policy | Contact us