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Newcastle chooses Pittsburgh for EHR

29 April 2008   Jon Hoeksma

Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has partnered with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre (UPMC) to deploy electronic health record technology.

Under the 14-month implementation plan, a UPMC technology team will install and adapt five electronic health record (EHR) applications at five Newcastle hospitals, including the Royal Victoria Infirmary, Freeman Hospital and Newcastle General Hospital, with a total of over 2,000 beds.

The five applications to be installed include inpatient order entry, patient administration, pharmacy management, accident and emergency services and operating room systems. Details of the applications to be used or the value of the deal were not disclosed.

UPMC and Newcastle have also formed a joint venture to provide IT services to other UK hospital trusts. “Newcastle will be an important proving ground for this partnership,” said Len Fenwick, chief executive of Newcastle Hospitals. “We are confident that others will soon see the value of what we are doing here and seek to replicate it.”

UPMC has regularly been voted one of the leading hospital groups in the US for its use of IT. Systems used by UPMC include: Epic System’s EpicCare for outpatient electronic medical records, Cerner’s PowerChart for electronic medical record management, Medical Archival Systems, Inc. for patient notes, Stentor for digital imaging, remote access tools and a physician portal.

“Our senior health care professionals are delighted with this opportunity to move forward with such enhanced IT systems. In addition, we are considering collaborations with UPMC in clinical medicine, research and development, which will be significantly strengthened by this IT improvement”, said Timothy Walls, medical director at Newcastle Hospitals.

“The Newcastle contract is the first of what we hope will be many international agreements for our information etchnology services,” said Dan Drawbaugh, chief information officer at UPMC. Donna McCormick, CIO of UPMC’s international and commercial services division will be based in London to oversee the Newcastle project and other UPMC international technology initiatives.

The Foundation trust’s decision to award a contract for EHR applications outside the NHS National Programme for IT (NPfIT) comes almost two years after it initially went out to procurement, rejecting the solution offered by the then local service provider Accenture.

In April 2006, Newcastle went out to tender outside the NHS National programme for IT, placing an advert in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU) for new EHR applications.

In February 2007 EHI reported that the trust was waiting to see how things develop after CSC took over from outgoing LSP Accenture.

Explaining why it has gone outside the NPfIT programme the trust said “Because of its long-standing commitment to using advanced technology to improve patient care, Newcastle sought an outside technology partner to implement elements of an electronic health record. Through a competitive bidding process, it selected UPMC as its prime contractor. The new system is expected to be fully compatible with the UK’s national programme for electronically connecting hospitals.”


Last updated: 1 May 2008 12:36

© 2008 E-HEALTH-MEDIA LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


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So many possible vendors

feetham91 177 weeks ago

There seem to be so many solutions being offered for EHR - however they all focus on one specialised area, 'EpicCare for outpatient EMR, Cerner for EMR Management' etc.

A system which intergrates from all your existing biomedical devices and PACS systems would surely be more cost efficient and make more sense? It would be more complimenting to the TCO. I would rather purchase one solution software, to transform existing paper records to electronic, than half a dozen from various vendors.


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feetham91
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Avoiding CRS?

Unknown 329 weeks ago

I was thinking of putting all my data into the CRS database .. It'll be safe there for years as nobody can access most of it!


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Re: Out of context ineptitude

Unknown 329 weeks ago

I think he was referring to this: http://www.ehiprimarycare.com/news/over_10_nhs_security_breaches_in_last_6_months

Perhaps some of these breaches were people using someone else's email address. And to post to the wrong thread too - just goes to show you can't be too careful with data. That's why I'm opting out of having my info on the CRS. If only we had some kind of information governance to keep things secure...


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Hmn, a variant on the repeated US model

Unknown 329 weeks ago

Sounds like there are bits of the (more advanced US) Cerner solution in there, and perhaps it is best of breed.

Good for Newcastle bucking the trend, but I fear that they could follow a long list of hopefuls adopting and regretting having American billing systems. Are Pittsburg clinicians truly using this suite of systems to obviate the need for paper records ?

Can it tell left from right (I understand this is irrelevant for billing purposes in the Cerner system, as the attending surgeons generally use paper).

Buyer beware !


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about UPMC, Newcastle's new partner

cepi oui 329 weeks ago

NEWS FLASH direct from UPMC's home city newspaper:

Charmless bracelet: UPMC should reform its patient ID system

Thursday, May 08, 2008

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Weather permitting, crews will hoist UPMC's giant letters atop the Golden Triangle's tallest structure this Saturday.

Since there seems to be no stopping this bad idea from being perched above the U.S. Steel Tower, maybe the successful medical network can atone by revamping its most common mark on Pittsburgh.

Take Social Security numbers off patient ID bracelets.

An institution with a $3 billion equity and fixed-income investment portfolio can afford to be on the cutting edge of client privacy. A hospital system that is enlightened enough to have its own vice president for privacy and information security should have a comprehensive policy that protects the identities of all patients.

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center doesn't.

John Houston, its privacy VP, said UPMC issues unique medical record numbers to new patients, but it continues to use Social Security numbers -- plus full name, birth date and insurance policy number -- on the bracelets the hospitals put on patients who are already in the system. That's thousands upon thousands of people who come to UPMC for quality treatment.

In the digital age, there's nothing high-quality about labeling patients, who may be drugged or asleep, with enough personal data on their wrists to steal an identity.

It's time UPMC left its mark around here in more discreet ways.


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cepi oui
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going abroad?

cepi oui 329 weeks ago

Granger did not have good things to say about Cerner. What Newcastle is getting may be Cerner in disguise. UPMC owns millions of dollars of Cerner stock shares as posted on Cerner's legal filings in the US. Interesting deal.


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cepi oui
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Re: careless posting

Unknown 330 weeks ago

If it is true that someone has used someone else's NHS mail account, surely that contravenes the conditions of use?


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Re:How far does this comply with National programme?

Mary Hawking 330 weeks ago

According to the North of Tyne IM&T strategy, it is intended to migrate all general practices to CSC/TPP SystmOne as a first step to Lorenzo level 4 - the fully integrated SSEPR.

How does the Foundation Trust's decision affect the SHA Strategy - which, in turn (according to board papers from Yorkshire and the Humber SHA) is partly based on contractual obligations on the part of the SHA to purchase a certain volume of LSP systems?

or am I missing something, and Lorenzo level 4 can/will be integrated into this system to provide the SSEPR?


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Mary Hawking
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careless posting?

Unknown 330 weeks ago

"Excessive potential access?

briony.bowen2@nhs.net

02 May 08 16:48

Chris, I'm interested in your comment on legitimate relationships and Smartcards. Can you expand on your specific concern on excessive potential access?

Tim Davis, Director of Information Governance, NHS Connecting for Health"

Looks as though there are a couple of problems here: probably posted to the wrong address - and is Tom Davis using briony.bowen2's NHS email?

(note to editor - if you remove the post referred to, could you remove this as well?)


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What is a standard?

Unknown 330 weeks ago

Doesn't this illustrate the fundemental misunderstanding being made by those advocating the standards led model of IT delivery? In reality, nobody in the NHS or DH has the authority to set and enforce IT standards. NHS organisations have proved that (unlike the university sector) they don't have the inclination to agree standards themselves.

So where does that leave us?


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