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Record access by 2015 a ‘tall order'

14 May 2012   Rebecca Todd

Dame Fiona Caldicott

The government's pledge to give all patients access to their electronic health records by October 2015 is a “tall order” for busy GPs to fulfill, Dame Fiona Caldicott has said.

The information governance champion, currently running a national information governance consultation, spoke at the Health In4matics conference in Birmingham last week.

She said there was now evidence that patients having access to their own record has a positive effect on use of resources in the NHS and patient satisfaction.

Chancellor George Osborne pledged in his Autumn Statement that everybody in England will have online access to their GP records by 2015.

However, Dame Fiona said it was “quite a tall order” for “hard pressed GPs and their teams to manage this within the next two to three years."

“There’s a question that some of the challenges of that haven’t been fully recognised because it’s a rather short time frame,” she said.

Patients are most interested in the practicalities of being able to book appointments and order repeat prescriptions online and GPs should start by offering that service, she added.

“It’s important to do this in a stepped way, starting with the transactional aspects. If you begin with what (patients) are very keen to have then move into more complex area of availability of clinical information, that’s a safer way to proceed.”

Dame Fiona added that as GPs were taking on a dual role - of both delivering care and commissioning it - there needed to be more discussion about how this would affect their relationship to patient data.

“Safe care relies on people knowing as much as possible about a patient; if a patient starts to think their data is not secure they will not share it, that’s the biggest risk of all,” she concluded.


Related Articles:

1 News: New Caldicott committee announced | 24 February 2012
Last updated: 14 May 2012 14:32

© 2012 EHealth Media.


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I have a Citizen Controlled Care record - I have broken the power of the state.

davesandbach 135 weeks ago

I am a former NHS COE and I have my GP, Hospital, dental and ophthalmic records plus data I collect weekly e.g. BP on line using Health Vault as the storage mechanism.

I also have my advanced directive and a decision support facility in the records. (Just in case)

If I had a Social Care record held by council that would be included in the online care record.

The era of personalised integrated care has arrived %u213 oddly enough the integration is controlled by the Citizen not the silo constricted servants of the state e.g. doctors and nurses etc.

There are lots of benefits for me, my carer and the professionals who have the privilege of delivering my personalised care package.

One reason above all which is an incentive for Citizens to have such a facility is self preservation and safety.

Dame Fiona recently said - As doctors, all of us have awareness of harm done to our own patient or a colleague's because information was not shared with others involved in their care. The reluctance to share appears particularly strong across the boundaries of health and social care organisations, including independent sector providers.

Dame Fiona Caldicott | 27th April 2012 Source: Pulse Today.

As the controler of my online record I am a one person Caldicott committee since I say who sees what and when. Big Al said No decision about me with out me and he ment it (I think) I certainly do.

It is easy and cost nothing to build an online record and I would recommend that readers of eHealth insider join with me and open their own online record facility.

Let me know if you need any help.

Will people be motivated to open a record - most will not especially youngster since they believe they are immortal.

The penny will drop first with the family Chief Medical Officers aka mother and mothers to be. A group who will get great advantage from this development and are tech savvy enough to take the opportunity to gain more control of their own and their families health records.

Also people in the death zone i.e. over 60 and those with long term conditions will in due couse as the news gets round how easy and cheap it is to have 24 /7 access to ones healt records.


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Comment on Patient Record Access..

Mary Hawking 135 weeks ago

Only one supplier - EMIS - has developed Patient Record Access so far, and even practices - such as Dr Amir Hannon's - http://www.htmc.co.uk/getaccessnow/ - have not persuaded all their eligible patients to sign up for it. (I suspect patients who have no medical problems feel no need for access).

Transactions - appointments, repeat prescriptions - are something totally different.

Surely the burden is less on busy GPs - although there is a considerable load there - than lack of motivation for system suppliers to develop the capability?

How does George Osborne propose to fund this - as this was in the budget, presumably there are figures for the potential financial impact, - and could someone point me to the evidence "that patients having access to their own record has a positive effect on use of resources in the NHS and patient satisfaction."?


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Mary Hawking
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High priests and the data protection bible

JacquesOuze 136 weeks ago

I'm sure the 'black art' accusation i at least partially true - after all, it's quite possible to carve out a nice little career for yourself as the local IG expert that way. But doesn't that just illustrate the fundemental problem: that data protection rather lends itself to this because it is quite complex?

If the rules for staff were simplified and we had clear national guidance that sharing for the benefit of the patient had primacy, then some of the problems would fall away. And quite a few systems could be simplified too.

Ah, but who would stand to lose their power and status if that came to pass? Just don't expect all those experts to go quietly.


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Duh - meant to post this on the IG article

JacquesOuze 136 weeks ago

Sorry - too many tabs open


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