22 December 2014 12:48


CCIO group
The IT dept should be a delivery agent, not the proposer and owner of clinical and administrative application Business Cases discussion
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John Aird
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Yes we need to ensure that a Trust’s money is spent in the best corporate interest, but IT demand exceeding what is affordable, perhaps the application of bureaucratic ROI based Business Cases makes IT being an easy target. Many times I have felt that the hurdles of a Business Case development were intended more to deter/limit IT funding than to secure the benefits that could / should arise. Key to achieving the desired is ownership of the underlying reason (Business Case) and of the actual implementation, by those who are going to use the service. We must link those who pay/fund with those who gain. It should not be the case (or seen by the Trust to be) that IT systems are there for the benefit of the IT Dept, there for their problem, just because they are funding an managing them. The IT Dept should be a contracted delivery agent, not the owner or funder. The Business Case must be about more that a cold ROI, they must have vision and strategic leadership too. Make the users own both the BC and the system.

IT is the tool - who determines its use and generates its value?

markjtoomey 152 weeks ago

This is absolutely correct. Across the board, we must stop thinking of the IT function as the omnipitent entity that has the ability to correctly discern the need for new tools in business (including the business of health care) and then to drive out the benefits of those new tools - especially when driving out the benefits typically involves complementary change in the skills of people, the processes that are performed, and the rules and structure under which the entire system operates.

In the modern world we have many suppliers that create a bewildering array of tools that we may use in our work and private lives. But these tools kave no value unless and until we use them to actually create value. It follows, logically, that those who use the tools should be the ones who justify their acquisition, because it is they who will deliver the value - however it is measured.

Useful goudance on this can be found in the ISO 38500 standard on governance of informaiton technology.


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Balance?

CertaCitrus 150 weeks ago

Agree IT should not be proposing changes in the way people work but maybe slightly blending it.

Is it IT or the demand for information? We have an internal patient centred information change and an NHS statistics driven one, they are 'fighting' each other within the IT department - competing for resources, however only one puts extra demands on the nurses.


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CCIO should consider themselves part of IT department

Jack Barker 147 weeks ago

There should be a CCIO in IT who also attends key hospital committees. Therefore, in that sense, no problem with "IT" proposing innovative solutions to hospital wide problems.


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